009 – Harnessing Leadership, Ethics, Intuition, and Courage

009 - Harnessing Leadership, Ethics, Intuition and Courage

Deb Radman discusses the power of harnessing the four horsemen of public relations: Leadership, Ethics, Intuition, and Courage. She explains why she would advise her younger self to shut up and listen, so she could really understand what’s being said. She contends that there is great power in taking time to think about something before you formulate an answer. We should then leverage the power of persuasion to engage, motivate, and activate.

Note:  This is a continuation of a conversation with Deb Radman from Episode 008.

Because of changes in the media landscape, PR now has “the opportunity to be the primary source of ideas for our companies and our clients as they seek new ways to communicate.” To do this, we have to venture way outside the box we’ve been in for so long, and have the guts and courage to do that.

Deb is in favor of integration across the communication spectrum. She argues that public relations professionals have “to be strong enough to go to clients with recommendations that transcend specific disciplines; we cannot be afraid to recommend integrated campaigns that include advertising, digital, promotion, direct response, and public relations.” According to Deb, all of these disciplines are part of PR, because they are all part of trying to persuade an audience to do what you want them to do. In her words, “Paid, earned, shared, and owned media all have to work together.” If paid, earned, and owned are not consistent, they will not help people share our message, because it will be fragmented. With this in mind, she argues that social media now is the province of public relations, because it is part of what PR practitioners do in the earned media arena.

According to Deb, mentoring adds tremendous value by helping our people develop creativity and that “it’s no longer sufficient to be able to write; we must also be creative problem solvers.” She describes the PRSA’s College of Fellows work with educators to create momentum for mentoring. She also urges junior PR practitioners to “Find teachers and mentors who will teach you what they know and what other people know.” While public relations people might be well-trained in communication techniques, they need to be even more capable of understanding what motivates people to engage. Deb stresses the importance of lifelong learning and the value in being exposed to marketers, innovators, researchers, and creatives in the advertising world and beyond.

High points in her career have included winning the USO contract, when she won her first Silver Anvil award, presenting the James C. Bowling Executive-In-Residence Lecture at the University of Kentucky, and serving as project lead for the IBM centennial celebration, which included IBM’s Watson competing on Jeopardy.

Listen to Part 1 of the conversation


Quotes:

“Paid, earned, shared, and owned media all have to work together.”

“Shut up and learn to listen.”

“Great teachers in public relations make leadership, ethics, intuition, and courage your learning target; if you can embrace that, you’ll go far.”

“Appealing to the heart is the most powerful motivator to get people to communicate on your behalf.”

“Communication is part of everything we do and who we are.”

“I wish we could have more breadth and experience in different disciplines in the PR programs, such as at the University of Kentucky.”

“Think about learning as a project for your whole life.”


Let me know what you think about this episode!

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Mayor drops a groove as he rocks social media

How do you get people to accept bad news?

That’s tough. What’s even more difficult is getting people to accept news that will have a negative impact on their lives. Perhaps the most thorny challenge is to get them to laugh and share that negative news. But, that’s just what the brilliant communicators at the City of Los Angeles accomplished.

Give your message a (musical) hook

In a stroke of creative genius, the mayor drops a groove as he rocks social media. Mayor Eric Garcetti’s slow jam lets Angelenos know that “the 101 will close for 40 hours this weekend, so we’re getting ready to take it slow.” The Sixth Street bridge is a major thoroughfare that will be shut down for construction, so there is some risk in making light of the situation. This communication initiative works, though, because the unique music video promotes the www.sixthstreetviaduct.org website that serves up key information for motorists.

Make the message integral and memorable

This approach also works, because it features a very polished performance by local high school students. According to Mayor Garcetti, “We teamed up with our friends at Roosevelt High School to drop a slow jam and get the word out.” Not only is he sharing information about road construction, but he also delivers subtle messages about infrastructure investment and the efficacy of the public schools. The fact that the Rough Rider Jazz Band is so smooth and polished makes this video instantly shareable.

Help your audience share your message

The team created the #101SlowJam hashtag and promoted it on the @LAMayorsOffice, @ericgarcetti, and @RooseveltHSLA Twitter feeds.

Kudos to Mayor Garcetti and his communications team for doing #BetterPRNow !