008 – You really need a reputation for integrity – Deb Radman part 1

008 Deb Radman part 1

PR veteran Deb Radman explains why you really need a reputation for integrity, the value of non-traditional hires in public relations, the power of intuition, and the necessity of courage. She explains how PR nightmares come from bad decisions. She presented the James C. Bowling Executive-In-Residence Lecture Series in the University of Kentucky’s Department of Integrated Strategic Communication.

Note:  This is Part two of a two-part series with Deb Radman; Part two is here.

Deb explains how the PRSA College of Fellows is promoting professional mentoring by Maria Russell (at Syracuse University‘s S.I. Newhouse School of Public Communications), Judy VanSlyke Turk (Professor Emerita from Virginia Commonwealth University), Elizabeth Toth (at the University of Maryland‘s Department of Communication), and other Fellows, because that is what will help non-traditional public relations professionals earn a seat at the table.

She also draws on lessons from Harold Burson, Richard Edelman, Betsy Plank, CKPR, and the USO.

Listen to Part 2 of the conversation


Key quotes:

From Deb Radman:

“If you want to get to the table, you have to learn to be a leader.”

“Shut up and learn to listen.”

“Engage, motivate, and activate.”

“PR can never be a panacea for bad behavior.”

“If you want to get to the table, you have to learn to be a leader.”

“Establish a reputation for integrity.”

From Richard Edelman:  “You have to aspire higher.”


How have you had to exercise courage in your practice?

Click the orange tab on the right and send a voice mail.

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

007 – Measurement Queen Katie Paine spills the beans on communication measurement

007 – Measurement Queen Katie Paine spills the beans about communication measurement

Katie Paine, who describes her career as “Journalist, turned MarComm, to Measurement Queen,” shares key insights on what it takes for effective communication measurement. She explains why solid research programs don’t necessarily require huge budgets, and also why designing a PR measurement program is so difficult for so many organizations. Hint: You must have clarity about your business goals and what communication activities drive those goals.

Katie reveals details from her amazing family history with journalism, public relations, and corporate communication. This fascinating history ranges from relatives editing Harper’s Bazaar, House & Garden, and the Baltimore News-American, to her grandfather’s connections to Stephen Crane and Cora Crane; Sherman Morris, Ivy Lee, and the PR history connected to the coal strike of 1902; Hill & Knowlton; and counseling both John Kenneth Galbraith and Buckminster Fuller.

Katie explains the problems with measuring Ad Value Equivalency (AVE) and impressions, and explains why using relationship-focused assessments developed by Jim Grunig and Lauri Grunig on trust, commitment, and satisfaction to assess the effectiveness of public relations programs is much more effective.

She shares lessons learned from her professional history writing for the Boston Herald, Washington Post, and San Jose Mercury News, along with how dropping a dip-laden cucumber on William Randolph Hearst, Jr. landed her a journalism job. She also recounts how she started the Delahaye Group and Paine Publishing; and producing The Measurement Advisor newsletter, which features a monthly Measurement Maven.

A prolific author, Katie has written “Measure What Matters,” “Measuring Public Relationships,” and “Measuring the Networked Non-Profit: How to Use Data to Change the World” with Beth Kanter.


Key Quotes:

“If you want your boss to appear on the cover of the New York Times, that’s easy: Strip him naked and have him run through Central Park chasing a bear, and he’ll be on the cover.

“The fundamental gap that exists in PR is that too many people want to show business value, but they don’t know what that is.”

“Research without insight is just trivia.”

“We are gathering data to make improvements.”

“Write about what you know.”

“If you know what drives customer behavior, you can work back from that to PR activities.”

“I’m asking them the hard questions: Please prioritize these 10 goals you have.”


How do you measure your public relations and marketing program?

Have a question about communication measurement?

Let us know by clicking the orange tab (yep, that one on the right) to send a voice mail.

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save