019 – Josh Elledge generates massive publicity on a shoestring budget

Starting his career as a Navy journalist and radio DJ, Josh Elledge built and now runs two very successful businesses:  Savings Angel and Up My Influence.  He has found a highly effective way to generate publicity at very low cost.  In fact, he has created more than $6 million dollars in media coverage for his businesses, essentially for free.  In this episode, Josh shares with us how he did it and he lays out the steps we can take right now to build our authority and promote our own businesses in the same way.

Josh Elledge generated $6 Million in free publicity

About Josh:

Josh Elledge is committed to democratizing PR & influence.  What does that mean?  Read on to find out!

This U.S. Navy veteran launched UpMyInfluence.com to help entrepreneurs attract the perfect audiences and grow their brands without the crazy costs associated with traditional PR companies.  UpMyInfluence’s purpose is to DEMOCRATIZE access to influence.  Josh believes he has a moral imperative to help entrepreneurs serve the world with their collective messages while growing their revenue!

UpMyInfluence was the natural outgrowth of his first startup, SavingsAngel.com, which has grossed more than $6 million in sales with less than $500 in advertising.  He did it all through building authority and serving audiences in the media.

Josh is a weekly TV consumer expert in Orlando, writes a syndicated newspaper column to 1.1 million readers, and regularly appears on more than 75 TV stations across the country.  All told, Josh has appeared in the media more than 2000 times.

Josh loves living in Orlando, FL with his wife and three children.


Josh’s Secrets to Generate Publicity:

Advertising is a tax you  pay for being unremarkable.  If you can focus on serving audiences … then you don’t have to pay for it as much.  If you’re a giving person who loves bringing value, there are a lot of stage you can speak on.

 

 

Exposure is everything.  When he didn’t have money for advertising, he reached out to radio stations, magazines, and newspapers to provide them content that would serve their audience.  The logic is that, if you give value to an audience, that will often result in positive media coverage; even if it doesn’t, you still create the opportunity to grow your network, which can be helpful the future.  This led to him becoming a columnist for his local newspaper, then a syndicated columnist, which led to TV appearances and syndication to 75 markets, with an audience of more than 1 million people.

If you pick one platform and dominate that platform, that’s how you become a social media celebrity.  Media now includes all influencers, including social media celebrities.

The more you can develop your own voice, the more comfortable you’ll be.

Your authority is your most valuable asset, so invest in growing it.  Authority and visibility is like developing muscle mass; you have to work on it.

Companies in the early stages should not be spending much money on PR agencies.

“Spray and pray” pitching is just spamming journalists; take the time to build relationships with journalists.  Focus on what you can do for the journalist first; you can ask for their help later.

Harness the power of relationships to create sustainable collaboration.

PR agencies should make the client the star of the show; the agency should try to remain invisible as they are facilitating the connection between client and media.

Agencies that insist on long-term, iron-clad retainers are just afraid.

The most important thing for us to be doing is growing our business.  That means we need to not just be the business operator, but the business owner; we need to be the face of the business.  Quit trying to grow your business from behind a computer screen; get out on stages.  Get media training.  Take your personal brand seriously.  How do you look online?  What are your indicators of authority?

 

 

Outsource as much of the business operation as possible; invest in growth by bringing in people who can speed up the system.  Hire someone to build your press kit with media clippings, headshots, etc.  Work on LinkedIn or Twitter; focus on one social media platform and outsource management of the rest of your social media.  Bring in an expert to help with strategy, social media management, copywriting, branding.  Pay for an expert; it’s money well spent.

It is the wise CEO who admits that they are not an expert in everything.

What keeps him motivated:  We believe we have a moral obligation to turn thoughtful entrepreneurs into media celebrities so we can increase their authority, influence, and revenue.

When you get to the point where you know that your product or service is going to change lives, then selling will be the easiest thing in the world.

PR professionals also have to eat their own lunch.  What does that mean?  Do public relations for yourself!

What is the best compliment someone can pay Josh?  “I appreciate your authenticity.”

Josh maintains that having a good press kit is essential for business leaders; and he puts his money where his mouth is.  Check out this example of an outstanding press kit.

 


 

Inspired to take action?  Josh can help; all you have to do is reach out to him.  Here’s how:

Contact Josh:

  Twitter:  @joshelledge
  Josh.Elledge on Instagram
  Up My Influence on Instagram

Special offers from Josh:

Other resources:

  Podcast Movement 2019 in Orlando

 

I’ve learned a lot from Josh and have implemented many of his tips.  I hope you learned a lot, as well.  If you enjoy this podcast and find value in it, please share it with a friend.  Here’s the iTunes link.

Thanks to Jennifer Sanchis of PRIME Research in Oxford, England, for the kind words and recommendations!  Check out her blog.

Also thanks to Dwayne Alexander, who runs both Alexander PR and The Content Place for his kind words and feedback all the way from Auckland, New Zealand!

That’s it for this episode.  Now, go out and do something really good in the world!

 

017 – Kill the PR Girl: Amy Sutton shares why diversity is key to powerful Public Relations

Amy Sutton, founder of Enjoy PR, takes us on her journey from law to PR. She shares why diversity is key to powerful Public Relations. We also explore the importance of relationships in PR and communications, and how to set expectations in client-agency relationships.
Amy recently published an article on LinkedIn titled “Kill the PR Girl,” in which she challenges the stereotype of “the PR Girl” and why that stereotype hurts both public relations professionals and their agencies, in part because of the reinforcement of glass ceilings. We explore the importance of diversity in public relations planning, specifically how diverse perspectives drive creativity and effective problem-solving.
Kill the PR Girl
Kill the (idea of the) PR Girl

Key Points:

Amy named her PR consultancy Enjoy, because, “Communications and PR should be a fun place to work.
Amy offers unique advice to those just starting their careers:
  • Have confidence in your abilities; know your skills and how you can apply them.
  • Always seek to learn new skills.
  • Remember to do the mundane things; this demonstrates commitment and it will pay off!
  • Invest in yourself and in your job.
  • Be proactive with every opportunity.

On starting your own business: “It’s scary, but anybody who has a vision, who has a dream for how they want to work, should grab the moment and go for it!”

On bait-and-switch pitching:  “What I don’t think is fair is to send in the bigwigs to the pitch, make a lot of promises that a less-experienced team will need to deliver, and they haven’t had any say in what they think will work.”

On building relationships with clients: 

  • “Being yourself is really important.” 
  • “You really need to get to know the people, because they are the ones who will bring you the interesting stories, tell you what life is really like at your clients and how you need to shore up for the future, and they are the ones who really understand the world they’re in and that you can get the messages from.”

On her article “Kill the PR Girl”:

  • 91% of PR practitioners in the UK are white.
  • 83% are British.
  • 64% are women.
  • There continues to be a gender pay gap of £9,000.
  • Only 2% of practitioners are disabled.
  • This doesn’t reflect the society we live in.
  • How do we, as communication professionals, speak to a diverse society when we are not reflecting that in our professional community?
  • What practical changes can we make in how we run our businesses to combat that?

On gender issues in the public relations profession:

  • In Episode 3, Professor Dustin Supa of Boston University discussed gender imbalance in the public relations profession.
  • The majority of practitioners are women, but the majority of agency heads and communications leaders are older men.
  • In Episode 9, Deb Radman would advise her younger self to shut up and listen.

Diversity and creativity go hand in hand

  • Bringing together people with diverse experiences and perspectives creates better results in brainstorming and planning.
  • “The sense of freedom that comes from being around a table with a lot of different people with different views is really empowering for everybody around that table, because you’re not all coming up with different versions of the same ideas, you’re really coming up with different ideas that really push people’s way of thinking.”
  • Pay attention to media (newspapers, blogs, etc.) that are outside your comfort zone.

“Millennials want to work for businesses that do good.”

What doesn’t work:

  • Letting clients think that a story that isn’t really newsworthy will get coverage; you have to be honest with clients.
  • Rolling out a new, genuine product on April Fool’s day; a useful product doesn’t need a gimmicky hook to be newsworthy.

Resources from this episode:

Evernote for jotting notes and scanning business cards on the go. (Note:  If you register for Evernote, I’ll get a credit.)

Facebook Groups to network, identify contacts, and generate business leads.  “Find discreet groups on Facebook that are very niche, maybe with a couple hundred people, but are really active.”

LinkedIn

Why I’m No Longer Talking to White People About Race” by Reni Eddo-Lodge.

Lynda.com 


Contact Amy!

Amy Sutton, founder of Enjoy
Amy Sutton, founder of Enjoy PR

Enjoy logo

Her company:  Enjoy PR

Email:  amy@enjoypr.co.uk

Call:  +44 (0) 7983 416 890

Twitter:  https://twitter.com/AmyatEnjoy  –  @AmyatEnjoy

LinkedIn:  https://www.linkedin.com/in/amy-sutton/

Coming full circle, check out Amy’s post on the power of podcasts:  From Page to Podcast: Amplify Content and Build Relationships.”

 


Organizations mentioned in this episode:

EDF Energy‘s 2012 Olympic campaign that reflected the mood of the nation, as measured by Tweets.  Articles include:

Samsung

Dell

LaCie

F-Secure 

Starbucks 


What did you think of this episode?  What’s your biggest challenge with PR?  Send me a note!

If you enjoyed this episode, please share it with a friend. Here’s the link: https://apple.co/2OLPETa


Warning:  Dad Joke ahead!

How do you get a Kleenex to dance? Put a little boogie in it.