Creating a Strategic Public Relations Podcast

"Communicate openly, honestly, and frequently." - Deborah Lee James Secretary of the Air Force (U.S. Air Force photo by Tech. Sgt. Tyrona Lawson/Released)

“Communicate openly, honestly, and frequently.”
– Deborah Lee James
Secretary of the Air Force
(U.S. Air Force photo by Tech. Sgt. Tyrona Lawson/Released)

Why blog about a podcast?

In this blog, I’ll document the process for creating the “Better PR Now” podcast, website, social media presences, and supporting collateral materials. I’m doing this in a public blog for two reasons: First, by publicly posting progress (or lack thereof), I will create some social pressure to keep me moving forward. Second, by documenting this process, I hope to provide useful insight for others who might learn from my mistakes and, hopefully, use what worked to jump-start their own podcast production.

Before focusing on the mechanics of creating the podcast, let’s take a quick look at the topic: Better PR Now. What does this mean?

Here’s the mission statement:

Better PR Now is a podcast created for communicators, whether in public relations, government public affairs, media relations, government relations, strategic communication, marketing, corporate communication, or a related discipline. Every episode delivers great insights, tips, and professional advice from some of the smartest, most experienced people in the field. I will talk with top practitioners and cutting edge researchers to find best practices as we explore new ways to hone our communication skills. Learn the secrets to success, the tools they use, and lessons learned. If you want to be a more effective, more influential, and more successful professional communicator, come along with Better PR Now as we improve Public Relations, one conversation at a time.

I think this is a worthwhile endeavor for several reasons. As a public relations and marketing professional for more than 20 years, I have witnessed:

  • Colleagues struggle to grow beyond the role of PR tactician.
  • Confusion about whether “public relations” is a set of communication tactics that support marketing, or a leadership function that enables the strategic management of the organization.
  • A disconnect between public relations practitioners who are looking for ways to improve and the scholars (academic researchers) who study the PR practice and profession. Both want to learn from and help the other, but they use different language and engage in different forums.

I believe these issues are all related. This podcast can advance the Public Relations profession by serving as a bridge between the academic and practitioner communities. It can provide useful insights and resources. It also can stimulate conversation about the roles, practice, and future of Public Relations.

You might also like:

Getting Started as a Podcasting Newbie.

Outsourcing: Interview Transcripts.